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  • Writer's pictureMicah Syswerda

The Dangers of Porn

Updated: Oct 4, 2022

For the longest time, to have access to pornography, you would have to go to that part of town to get some. Considered scandalous and dirty, society would turn a blind eye to what would be bought, viewed, and consumed there. But over time, porn has become so readily accessible, from back alleys to access on any browser. When launched, websites like Pornhub grew so popular that within a month, they had more users than any other sector of the online consumer market. But something not often addressed is how the consumer of pornography has changed over the past decades, more specifically, the age group. The typical person buying physical pornography from magazine providers was not a 10 to a 14-year-old kid; however, with no more barriers, young kids have had more accessible access to pornography than ever.


Before addressing the dangerous effects of pornography—the purpose of this post—we must discuss how it has spread so quickly. Society has determined that pornography is “necessary.” Pornography is “healthy.” Pornography is “non-addictive.” Pornography is “empowerment.” These headliners have infiltrated the minds of the young as they slowly come to believe that pornography is safe. However, it isn’t.


Pornography is dangerous.


As early as 1996, behavioral scientists had their suspicions about the dangerous effects of pornography. Initially, they wanted to conduct a study on a possible correlation between pornography usage and sexual offenses, specifically dating violence. But what they found was so much worse. Underneath the porn industry’s message of women and male empowerment was a much darker message—those who watched increasingly aggressive pornography began to justify rape and other violent sexual behaviors.


Similar studies were conducted on Swedish teenagers in 2015 as society began to justify pornography usage in teens as “normal.” However, the results were devastating. The study found that pornography usage can have similar effects on brain chemistry, just as it would with hard drugs. But that’s not all. They also concluded prolonged pornography usage causes:

 Lowered sexual satisfaction

 Sexual dysfunction in both males and females

 Lower desires for social interaction

 Higher levels of delinquent behavior

 Higher levels of depressive symptoms

 Decreased bonding with family

By watching pornography, we effectively put a drug into our bodies as an addict would on the streets, but now it can occur in the comfort of our homes.


Pornography hurts our bodies.

Pornography rewires our brains.

And without proper education, pornography will continue to ravage the world.


So, what are YOU going to do about it?


Go to youreworthit.info for more information on how you can educate your community and schools on the harmful effects of the porn industry.







Sources:

George, Manju, et al. “Psychosocial Aspects of Pornography - Sage Journals.” Sage Journals, 22 Mar. 2019, https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2631831818821535.


Owens E, Beuhn R, Manning J, Reid R. The impact of Internet pornography in adolescents: A review of the research. Sex Addiction Compulsivity. 2012;19:99–122. doi:10.1080/10720162.2012.66043/


Peter J, Valkenburg PM. Adolescents and pornography: A review of 20 years of research. J Sex

Res. 2016. doi:10.1080/00224499.2016.1143441


Svedin C, Åkerman I, Priebe G. Frequent users of pornography: A population based

epidemiological study of Swedish male adolescents. J Adolesc. 2011;34(4):779–788.

doi:10.1016/j.adolescence.2010.04.010

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